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Emotions in Middle English Literature

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Date: 9 July
Time: 9am-6pm
Venue: Old Arts, Room 205, The University of Melbourne
Contact: Stephanie Trigg

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Join CHE at The University of Melbourne for a study day on Emotions in Middle English Literature with the following scholars:

Stephen Knight graduated from Jesus College, Oxford in 1962 and then worked in English at the University of Sydney as Teaching Fellow, Lecturer, Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor until 1986, with two years at the Australian National University (1968-9). In 1987 he moved to the Robert Wallace Chair of English Literature at the University of Melbourne, and then in 1992 to the foundation chair of English at De Montfort University, Leicester. He became Head of English at the University of Wales, Cardiff, in 1994 and was Head of School there 1996-9. In 2006 he was appointed Distinguished Research Professor at Cardiff and retired in 2011, to return to Melbourne. He is a Fellow of the English Association and of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

Sarah McNamer is an Associate Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Georgetown University. Her primary interest is in the relation between literature and the history of emotion. Her book, Affective Meditation and the Invention of Medieval Compassion, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2010, received the "Book of the Year" award from the Conference on Christianity and Literature. Current projects include a book in progress, The Poetics of Emotion in Middle English Literature, and an edition and translation of the Canonici version of the pseudo-Bonaventuran MVC, a newly-discovered Italian text likely to be the original version of this influential work (as described in her article, "The Origins of the Meditationes Vitae Christi," Speculum 84 [2009]: 905-55).

James Simpson (keynote speaker at Genre, Affect and Authority in Early Modern Europe) is the Donald P. and Katherine B. Loker Professor of English at Harvard University (2004-). He was formerly based at the University of Cambridge, where he was a University Lecturer in English (1989-1999) and Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English (1999-2003). He is a Life Fellow of Girton College and an Honorary Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.Prof. Simpson was educated at Scotch College Melbourne, Melbourne University (BA) and the University of Oxford (MPhil). He holds a doctorate from the University of Cambridge.

For more information contact Stephanie Trigg at: sjtrigg@unimelb.edu.au or +61383445504