Research Stream

Mick Warren

Mick Warren graduated with a PhD from the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry (SOPHI) at The University of Sydney in May 2018. His PhD research was supported by a 'Top-Up' scholarship from the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. He completed his BA (Hons) at The University of Sydney in 2012 and a BSc (Biology) at the Australian National University in 2006. In his Honours thesis Mick focused upon representations of Aboriginality in Australian nationalist discourse throughout the twentieth century. Mick’s PhD research draws attention to the mobilisation of fear and white victimhood in the context of European settlement between 1788–1838 in New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land. His thesis suggests fear played an important role in providing settler communities imaginative and rhetorical ballast during periods of heightened frontier unrest between Europeans and Aboriginal people. 

Contact

m.warren@sydney.edu.au

Research Projects

Unsettled Settlers: Fear and White Victimhood, New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land 1788–1838

Conference Papers

‘“The Wickedness of Three Kingdoms”: Navigating the Emotions of George Augustus Robinson’s Friendly Mission’, inaugural conference of the Society for the History of Emotions ‘Emotions of Cultures/Cultures of Emotions: Comparative Perspectives’, The University of Western Australia, 11–13 December 2017.

'Suffering Settlers: Fear and its Genocidal Potential, New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land 1816–1830', The Australian Historical Association Conference, The University of Sydney, 6–10 July 2015.

'"In the hope of striking terror": From "Amity and Kindness" to the Performativity of Violence in New South Wales and Van Diemen’s 1788–1830', 'Emotions in the Early Modern Contact Zone' Study Day, The University of Western Australia, 26 April 2015.