Research Stream

Madeline Shanahan

Madeline Shanahan is an Associate Investigator (2015) in the ‘Meanings’ programme of the Centre for the History of Emotions. In 2005 she was awarded a First-class Honours degree in historical archaeology from the University of Sydney, where her thesis addressed the convict huts and early penal landscape of Parramatta, NSW. After the completion of her honours thesis Madeline moved to Dublin, where she worked as a consultant archaeologist, before being awarded a highly competitive Ad Astra Research Scholarship with the John Hume Institute for Global Irish Studies to undertake her PhD at University College Dublin in 2008. Her PhD thesis examined the culture of recipe writing in early modern Ireland, and has recently been published as an academic monograph with Lexington books, entitled Recipe Manuscripts as Archaeological Objects: Food and Text in the Early Modern World (2014). Since the completion of her PhD, Madeline has returned to Australia and is currently employed as a Senior Research Historian in the Native Title sector in Melbourne. Her areas of interest and expertise relate to post-medieval Ireland, early modern women, colonial Australia, domestic space and historical archaeology theory.

Contact

madelineshanahan@gmail.com

Research

Mother’s Milk: Breastfeeding, Infant Care and Domestic Medicine in Early Modern Ireland

Publications

Monographs

Shanahan, M. 2014. Manuscript Recipe Books as Archaeological Objects: Text and Food in the Early Modern World. Lexington Books

Book chapters

Shanahan, M. 2015 (in press). ‘Wright by her own hande’: manuscript recipe books as sources for the study of culinary material culture (1660 to 1830). In Food and Drink, The Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy.

Shanahan, M. 2014 (in press). ‘Food and Capitalism’. In Beaudry, M. & Metheny, K. (eds.) The Archaeology of Food: An Encyclopedia. Alta Mira Press

Journal Articles

Shanahan, M. 2012. Dining on Words: a discussion of manuscript recipe books, culinary change and elite food culture in Ireland (circa 1660 to 1830). In Irish Architectural and Decorative Studies, the Journal of the Irish Georgian Society, Vol. XV, 82-97

Scholarships and Grants

2008-12: University College Dublin Ad Astra Research Scholarship/ John Hume Institute for Global Irish Studies